Final Show: #CrouchHillBanbury

Despite the recent Periscope app update which now allows permanent archive of Broadcasts with chat, I made the decision to allow auto-delete after 24 hours.

The ephemerality and impermanence is an essential component of my work and process, highlighting the concept of dynamic socially created space.

Traces of previous broadcasts are now no longer visible as they were previously

Paradoxically, the events below are heavily documented through Screen-shots from the Broadcasts, created within the 24 hrs before they became unavailable……

it’s really hard to let things go…especially when you need evidence of your process….

 

John Ruskin – Work:

15th July

I read aloud from John Ruskin’s lecture ‘ Work ‘ delivered at the Working Men’s Institute Camberwell in 1865,( which is now the South London Gallery……..?)

to link my location on Crouch Hill in Oxfordshire with Camberwell. This also served as a point for further reflections on work, labour, art and relative positions in contemporary society.

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There were 130 in the Lifestream audience at one point and generally retention was better with people usually sticking it out for a while on each brief Scope.I’m finding the stats interesting to analyse despite not searching for ‘Likes’.

I decided to leave the tent up for the duration of the Show, over the weekend and for the rest of the week until Tuesday evening.

I wrote a note to explain and left it in the tent. I left contact details as well, out of courtesy.

Often, teens camp-out and sometimes just leave the tents.

I didn’t want it to be damaged, removed, offend someone unnecessarily or occupied by another person!

Martin Fiennes – Broughton Castle:

16th July:

Martin’s parents are Lord and Lady Saye and Sele.

William FIENNES (1st Viscount Saye and Sele).The only son of Richard Fiennes, 7th Lord Saye and Sele, he was educated at New College, Oxford, and succeeded to his father’s lordship (barony) in 1613. English politician and promoter of colonization in America. He was a Puritan in religious sympathy and a leader in the House of Lords of the opposition to James I and Charles I.

I invited Martin to Crouch Hill, where he spoke of his visions for the preservation of areas of countryside, whilst accommodating the need for housing into the future. He also talked of  his imaginings of the Puritan and Royalist troops, noisily riding up and down past the foot of the Hill along what is now a busy B road, prior to the siege of Banbury Castle, and the Battle of Edge Hill in 1642.

It brought the past alive for a moment or two, and changed my visions of the present.

He was surprised and amused by the 249 viewers.

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Dozing in my Tent:

17th July

I just started to broadcast  and lay down in a warm tent for a doze…showed the sky to  over a hundred people…Strange, this periscope business…

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33 comments! and a surprising number of viewers.

also found a note when I opened the tent…. it said ‘PLEASE DON’T ‘

I wasn’t sure what they wanted me not to do?
Stay….? Go…?

Some dog-walkers came past and had a chat

Paul Mobbs (@ramblinactivist) :

17th July

I’d invited Paul to talk as he has a deep knowledge of the Quaker Civil War history of the area and an involvement in peace activism in contemporary conflict.

He forms a link from this final work to my initial investigations in Croughton , the Reading Room and RAF Croughton.

In fact, when he arrived he didn’t want to talk about those topics at all but lead a popular walk around the Hill discussing local geology and its implications.

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Edith Eisler, 

18th July

This was the anniversary of Edith’s death in 2011. A  violinist, teacher, noted musician and critic.This is  a recording of her playing Hindemith 

I told the story of how my father became friends with Edith and her family during WWII, following their movement from Vienna to Britain.

Also their subsequent correspondence whilst my father found and located in Japanese POW camp in the Far East, and following his release.

This family correspondence continued, even following my father’s death.

Her kindness has enabled me to pursue this Post-Graduate study.

(Along with a Vice- Chancellors Scholarship from The University of the Arts London).

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iChing and Philip K. Dick

19th July

I am interested in the link between subjective evaluation involved in Divination practice and ritual with the binary code which underlies all things digital.

See this article here in The Guardian

and this J Proteome Sci Comput Biol. 2012; 2012(1): 3. Published online 2012. doi: 10.7243/2050-2273-1-3

I had hoped to use yarrow stalks from the Hill but the season was late and there were few available.

I’d also thought of using Glo-sticks but their popularity at the Public View put paid to that…everyone wore them home..

So I used the cards I’d used in previous broadcasts.

The whole event became ludicrous…more so than other Scopes, as Tia and Purdy, the dogs belonging to my ‘assistant’ were in playful mood.

In the end one of the dogs, Purdy, selected one of the cards…

I read from Philip K Dick, the visionary writer, who cites the iChing in The Man in The High Castle.

His alternative outcome from WWII, and the implications, are  worth re- considering now, I believe. The sun set, the moon was almost full.

In total with Louise’s simultaneous broadcast of the event, there were over 750 viewers..

???!!!!

These were the cards selected.

4 Meng: INEXPERIENCE

Humbleness and sincerity when comprehending will increase knowledge.

9 Hsiao Ch’u GENTLE RESTRAINT, HOLDING BACK

Dense clouds suggest postponing the action till after the rain.

56 Lu: THE WANDERER, THE TRAVELLER

The steadfast and persistent traveller will have good luck.

Make of that, what you will….

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UAL Summer Show: Camberwell College of Arts, Wilson Road, London SE5 8LU

20th July

I went to the Final Crit with my cohort at Camberwell. Saw many of my colleagues and enjoyed seeing the Show.

It was odd walking into an exhibition containing my own work but where I had delegated set-up to colleagues. They had displayed many of the bowls around the building but as these are now empty they had been removed.

The last remaining had been give a plinth, two bowls placed one inside the other with a top light in a dark space. It looked tremendous! Donald Takeshita-Guy had been mainly responsible and is keen on developing his curation skills.

It worked really well

IMG_4537

Later, Clara and I met with the collective of artists to talk about plans for our residency in Norway in 3 weeks time. Very exciting.

Little Venice Studio  with Clara Duran, Keir Williams,  Dave Meckin, Alice Helps, Joe Fairweather-Hole

and then…..NORWAY RESIDENCY and Neptune Developers Camp, Melbu, Nordland

Neptun Introduction

and as Manuel from MAFAD said

” So long and thanks for all the fish”

Its been amazing,  Thanks Jonathan K!

Continue reading Final Show: #CrouchHillBanbury

‘Salt of the Earth’, ‘Bitter Lake’ and ‘Bowling for Columbine’

Last weekend I went to see  the Sebastian Salgado film ‘ Salt of the Earth’

It was at the charming, tiny Chipping Norton Theatre – not many people there but interestingly in the ads before one for the joining  a debate about the Leverson Enquiry.

I’ve looked on- line for it…trying to remember the address, but it was on screen for such a short time I cant find it…Odd as the video was quite long….

Very pertinent as both Rebekah Brooks and David Cameron live a spit away from the Theatre….

About the film, it was shot by his son and Wim Wenders and fascinating though some of his images very distressing and as an autobiography left a lot of personal and, for me, ethical questions about his work and approach, hanging in the air.

I didn’t like the fact that his face was used as an overlay so much with him talking. Just his voice would’ve been fine and interviews separate.

It mixed him and his work up and maybe that’s what it was supposed to do: maybe, but the harshest of realities of some of his outstandingly beautiful images was enough of a contrast without the rather romantic approach to his life and decision making.

Still it was powerful film and interesting from a ‘witnessing’ point of view about what images to shoot and why.

Also how his interests developed as he changed…. because of the images he had taken.

A real reflexivity there..

I’d still have preferred to realise that myself rather having it directed at me with the portrait overlay.

Made me wonder about my recent effort…. and whether that says what I hope it does.

In contrast to that film, a Feature  available on DVD and at cinemas, is Adam Curtis’s,  iPlayer only, Bitter Lake which I don’t think I’ve posted about, but meant to…

I saw it a month or two ago and it really is transforming. An ‘enjoyable’ film in its own right, so intelligent in its analysis and the quality of its making.

I’ve only remembered to blog about it when Jonathan mentioned him in one of the Skype chats. It is focused on events in Afghanistan and how the situation came to be.

Lots of factual stuff presented very clearly within a ‘beautiful’ visual narrative that  also alludes to ideologies without overstating them.

Really impressive. I will watch more of his work.

It seems appropriate to watch these especially as journalism as a form of witnessing and documenting have come to my attention even more through the Reading Room work

I started the MA thinking about Documentation and Myth but things have sort of changed….I’ll have to assess how exactly.

Previously I was interested in the ‘truth’ of documentation and the effects of subjectivity etc..styles of Reportage but I need to address some of my thoughts about style in the very least…..

The other is Bowling for Columbine, which I watched some time ago.

Style completely different and of course, Michael More features in it.

What is great is the relationship he builds up with people and so what he manages to report.

It is the peoples’ ‘ truth’ as you can see it spoken but his interview style and way of working is really clever and of course the content is fascinating, and funny as well as horrific. A very clever combination.

So, I’m not going to make documentary film but the styles are still important.

I haven’t discussed cinematography or anything here…just really reminding me over the overall differences in style…

And also the effect the Leverson enquiry has had on the British Press and how we , as a public, perceive ‘it’.

A very different ideology from that in 1903 when the Reading Room opened!

Titles for Work: Beware !!!

This is a retrospective post as I’m still waxing lyrical about the Reading Room event in the summer because I learnt such a lot- Things I have learnt before but re- learnt again….

One of these was checking any title for work I have made by  doing an internet search before I print labels etc…

For the Interim Show  I wanted to call the work something  which was ‘catchy’, descriptive sad appropriate    ‘ Read All About It’ seemed appropriate as it alluded to news papers and a time when they were advertised verbally by men wearing Sandwich Boards. Fitting with the age of the Reading Room… and what I wanted an audience to do.

My search led me to this…by Pro. Green and Emilie Sande. I was aware of the song but hadn’t taken much notice of it.

Then I watch this vid by Pro.G and actually found it very moving and powerful (and changed my opinion of Emilie Sand who I hadn’t really given much time to….)

More to the point, it meant that I no longer wanted to call the work ‘Read All About It’.

It seems inappropriate  for a younger audience because of this reference.

[Reflecting on this so long after the event, I actually think I should have stuck with my original decision as it would have lead to the audience taking some action…which was the reason for wanting it in the first place… and many of the audience would not associate this newer reference…and I  was aware of it anyway.. so that would have made it OK.Stick to my original thoughts, I think in future… and OWN THEM FOR MYSELF!   Lesson Learnt]

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha

I have discovered this amazing ACT ( Art, Culture and Technology)  MIT Program site with enough visual and lecture material to keep me busy for weeks.

This lecture ( as below) introduced me to Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, a Korean artist I was not familiar with!

How did I miss her !

Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Passages Paysage
Courtesy of the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Translations of Memory
Elvan Zabunyan
Art critic, historian, and Associate Professor, University of Rennes (France)

“The starting point of Elvan Zabunyan’s talk is the work of Korean-born American artist and poet Theresa Hak Kyung Cha. In 1980, having left her native Korea seventeen years earlier, Cha returned to work on a film project she described as “memory [that] materializes directly on the screen.” Cha was fluent in English, French, and Korean and worked with words as images and with images as words, using the structure of language and translation to create a multiplicity of narratives in time, space, and memory.

Elvan Zabunyan is a contemporary art historian and art critic based in Paris. Her research focuses on the redefinition of contemporary art history through postcolonial and feminist art and theory in the context of the genealogy of cultural displacement. She is the author of Black Is A Color: A History of Contemporary African-American Art (2005) and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Berkeley, 1968 (2013). Her essays on contemporary visual arts have appeared in books, exhibition catalogues, and journals. She is an Associate Professor at the Rennes University (Brittany, France) and Director of the Curatorial Program in the Art History Department.”

Her work is also featured in this book Visualizing Feeling: Affect and the Feminine Avant-garde by Susan Best which will be a key reference for me, as it features Lygia Clarke, Anna Mendieta and Eva Hesse , all of whose work  my work has referenced and echoed even when I don’t intend it to.

£111  or £14 on Kindle! guess which one for me…

Also this lecture which is in French but still has some good video!

https://www.centrepompidou.fr/id/ciMkMB/rBK9xe7/fr

Despite the ‘distance ‘ of this performative work from the digital work I have been investigating it is still at the core of my practice.

Somehow I have to bring these two aspects together.