14th November 2015 : waking up.

When I woke the next morning……having not seen any news the evening

before……I looked at on my phone straight away as I usually do.

I felt my actions the day before 13th November and  13th November continued were somehow prescient.

‘The Paris attacks’.

I haven’t got screen shots of those images as I was too shocked and concerned for people I knew of who lived in the area or were visiting.

This image here, now all too familiar.Screen Shot 2016-01-20 at 09.32.52

and these from the Guardian,  images of many of the Front Pages of newspapers from around the world.

The shock changed into something else…..a feeling that as I was walking, thinking and acting so other actions were taking place simultaneously, elsewhere.

As mentioned in my previous post I’d been thinking about weaponry/ munitions, the actions performed  and the ritualistic nature of  their use in the  17th century ( and before) and in the present day before visiting Kineton, because of its association with storage of ammunition over many years.

The fact that these actions are played out globally not locally, in several places at one time but the ‘placement’ of these essential objects of this particular ritual are centred on this one location: one with such historic significance in the development of British politics and social history because it’s association with the start of the English Civil War.  See from this quote below from Caroline Wyatt in the Daily Telegraph 12th August 2012

The level of stocks held by the MoD only becomes clear when we visit Europe’s biggest ammunition depot, as we track the bullet on its journey from the factory. The depot lies in the tranquil countryside of Warwickshire, where Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hirst, the head of establishment for Defence Munitions Kineton, looks after several square miles of ammunition stores. Security is tight for the £2 billion of ammunition kept here.
“We are capable of storing about 50,000 pallets of ammunition,” he says, gesturing at row upon row of tidy boxes, stacked tightly from floor to ceiling in one of Kineton’s many warehouses. “We’ve been supporting defence since 1942, from operations such as Bosnia, Kosovo, the Gulf and more recently Afghanistan, as well as the campaign in Libya.”
From Kineton, the ammunition destined for Helmand goes to RAF Brize Norton, where it is flown to Afghanistan in a huge RAF C17 aircraft, landing at Camp Bastion, the UK logistics hub in Helmand.

My visit to the sited memorial  the previous day, hearing the distant deep explosions, somehow ‘sensing’ the history of past events from a psychogeographical point of view ,seeing the museum displays of  flintlock pistols, pikes and other weaponry and then the unfolding of events in Paris…..all these things reinforced the theories discussed in my Research Paper  see for Bibliography citations below.

From the Abstract:

Collective events, individual action and embedded practice act through embodied memory and both material and immaterial remains, as manifestations of previous actions and relations. These act reflexively in a continuing atemporal narrative process of actions, events, interrelations and subjective experience.

Temporal boundaries between present and past are arbitrary; the boundary is an ‘illusory’ horizon similar to the perceived physicality of the visual horizon.

Doreen Massey states:

‘space is always under construction, a product of relations between, relations embedded in material practices in the process of being made, never closed or finished.’(Massey, 2005 p9)

Lefebvre’s ideas on space regard places of social space as combined, superimposed and colliding; the local never absorbed regionally, nationally or globally (Lefebvre, 1991 p 88). He states that nothing disappears completely, earlier actions remain to underpin what follows; not just traces, memories or relics are left behind, instead, preconditions of social space endure and remaining real within that space (Lefebvre, 1991 p229).

Concluding:

Collective events, individual actions and embedded practice act through embodied memory and both material and immaterial remains – manifestations of previous actions and relations reflexively producing interrelations which occur within and between the communities ( locally and globally ).

Rather than being distinct, they are interwoven and accumulated in a continuing process of interrelations and material remains occurring within a durational present free from temporal boundaries. Subjective experience, individual small actions and larger events contribute to a narrative and constructed environment with equivalent significance in a cumulative continuum.

 

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